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Curio: “Organic Salt Soap”

While on my usual rounds at the Section 17 market in PJ one morning last week, I spotted an old uncle selling what looked like blocks of pink coloured things from a small table. He instantly picked up on my interest, launching into a barrage of cantonese explaining what the stuff was. I guess he also noted my blank smile that belied the fact that I could barely understand him so he pulled out a leaflet written in english. :p

They were solid bars of salt, meant to be used in the shower. This was totally new to me so I was rather fascinated (albeit a little sceptical). After the sales pitch about it being great for solving all kinds of skin problems, I thought it was worth trying on myself to find out once and for all if all that stuff was true. BUT let it be known that I felt guilty about it supposedly being imported from Poland… the thought of all the carbon emissions from transporting what are practically rocks across vast distances… eep. :”>

Anyway, here’s the smaller, unpackaged chunk of “organic salt soap” that I bought:

It could be a projectile weapon for the bathroom. Hm.
It could be a projectile weapon for the bathroom. Hm.

This photo was taken after a week’s use. It’s hardly shrunk. It also struck me that the salt looked very similar to the kinds you find on those salt lamps that you put light bulbs in and that supposedly release ions to cleans the air around it etc. Anyway.

Interestingly enough, the eczema on the insides of my elbows which flared up in the heat, seems to have cleared with a day’s use of the salt soap. I also tried it on my face (as instructed by the old uncle), wetting the skin then applying some of the ‘soap’, leaving it on for about 3 minutes before washing everything off under the shower. While I did not notice anything remarkably different after using the salt, I did feel that my skin had a pleasant, healthy texture. It’s like having an isolated dip in the sea, isn’t it?

The only mistake I made was to think that I could rub the bar of salt *directly* onto my skin for a scrubby effect. DON’T DO IT. Not only did it scratch my skin, the salt stung like crazy. Ah, silly me. I should have known better!

So the verdict? It’s an interesting object to have in your bathroom, and for most Malaysians who don’t have bath tubs to use bath salts in, this could be a feasible alternative. I doubt it can completely replace normal soap as a cleansing item. Plus it’s Not something I would use for my hair – and overall I still prefer my soap with all their lovely essential oils and creamy lather! Yes yes, I’m biased…

But here you go – some additional reading on the net yielded these articles that expound the many benefits of salt for our health:

And just in case you’re curious as to what this particular uncle’s claims are on the efficacy of his “Organic Salt Soap”, here’s a reproduction of the contents of his flyer:

  • Imported from Poland
  • Contained of natural Organic Calcium and different types of minerals
  • Provides nutrition to your skin directly
  • Helt to increase metabolism, removes dead skin cell
  • Help to improve your skin healthy level
  • Function: Reduce inflammation, kill germs and bacteria
  • Smoothen and soften your skin if regularly use
  • Good for Itchy skin, sensitive skin, smelly feet, ring worm, white spots, black spots, dark skin, pimples, wound inflammation, scrap, crack heels, removes muscles pain, slowing down your aging process, reduces wrinkles, whitening skin.
  • Contact number: 012-3442038 (Wilson)
  • Contact number: 016-3721312 (Uncle Loo)

Hope you’re having a good start to your week!

10 thoughts on “Curio: “Organic Salt Soap”

  1. it look like the salt lamp? is it really the same? from different places. how much is it?

    1. I can’t say if it’s the same as those salt lamps for sure, but they do look similar. The soap was just RM10 for a bar.

  2. Is the surface of the soap very rough? like sand? ..

    1. Alvin: yup, pretty much. You have to sort of moisten it in your hands and use the solution on your body, you can’t use it directly on your skin as you would a normal bar of soap–unless you want some serious scratches!

  3. Hi do you sell the organic salt soap you mentioned? Am interested.
    Pls email me at yuqichow@hotmail.com

    1. Hi Celine, sorry but I don’t sell the salt soap. It just so happened that I chanced across someone who did at my local wet market.

  4. i had used for a week times and i apply it on my face,there is a suggestion by the seller that, it could helps to lightened the pigmention and balance up the skin colour,but i still cant see any changing and improvement on my skin…do i need to continue use it or stop(because i felt my skin is more dry after usimg the salt soap) , or i used in the wrong matter.(i apply it after cleanse by skin cleanser)

  5. Hey Vivian, unfortunately I can’t advise you on whether or not to continue using the salt soap, or if the method you are employing is correct (it seems fine). I have since stopped using that salt soap which I bought and have thrown it out, simply because I got lazy. It was too rough on my hands and rather clunky to use. I dropped it on my foot once, and only my kids found that funny.

    Just do what you feel is best for your skin – pay attention to what it is telling you. Even though it may seem like wasted money to stop using this salt soap, it’s a small price to pay for the sake of your skin’s wellbeing. What may work for some people may not be suitable for you. 🙂

  6. i just bought a bar of organic salt soap from an old man in section, pj. i started to use, it is rather hard and heavy. can i soak it with water to make it soft?

    1. Hi Henry, nope it won’t get any softer – it is, after all, a lump of mineral salt. It’s either rock hard or completely dissolved in water! :p It’s not something that will lather either. What you are doing is actually rinsing yourself in salted shower water. Maybe you can leave it to soak in a large tub of warm water and allow it to dissolve in it, then use that water to rinse yourself? I know it’s pretty harsh to rub it directly on the skin (even at the bottom of one’s feet). Hope this helps!

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